Parvo Treatments - Specifically Tamiflu 

You must get involved in the health and medical treatment of your Pet.

99% of all Doctors of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) that deal directly with the public, in my opinion, don't give a crap about your animal and want it to be sick so they can continue to buy BMWs and take extra long vacations.  I've seen it first hand.  When I know
of more treatments that I know work than the vet treating an animal then there leaves little doubt in my mind as to the creditability of
the vet not using known treatments.
 

 
Subject: Parvo and Tamiflu

For those who don’t know, Parvo is a virus that attacks cells that divide rapidly in the body:  intestinal cells and white blood cells (the infection fighting cells).  It causes profuse vomiting and diarrhea.  It also can cause serious infections because there aren’t enough white blood cells to kill the infection.

Why would a vet not using a medication that has proven to work? Because there is no treatment? Because there are too many strains? Because we can't detect it in time? Or because DVM's make thousands in "fake treatments" and profit HUGELY from killing your new family member?

You read correctly. Your DVM Makes THOUSANDS if you care enough to let him treat your pup for parvo and not
demand he use a med that has proven to work.

 There is a $50 treatment available for your pup that your DVM knows about. If they dont... they have no business being a DVM in the first place. This information has been available for YEARS to your DVM. YEARS!!

Why do so many Vets prefer to ignore or worst, deliberately not use a med that works and rather watch your pup die, and collect your money.   I've heard of vets who will try to juke you, fake you, and distract you by saying there is no proof and there have been no case studies. ALL LIES!!!! There is a case study for both Parvo and Kennel Cough being treated SUCCESSFULLY right on the net.  Just google it! MORE THAN THAT there are HUNDREDS of real life success stories out here... and some by DVM's and SHELTERS!!!

 Many vets do not  keep Parvo snap tests on hand because they claim they are to expensive and they expire quickly.
A wholesale 10 pack of Parvo snap test runs between $30 and $40 depending on the brand and they last 6 months.
HOW is that too expensive when they can tell within 15 minutes if a puppy has Parvo and begin effective early
treatment? 

Why is the snap test important?

PARVO IS HUGELY TIME SENSITIVE! (or more importantly, the start of treatment QUICKLY is hugely important) Vets who do fecal floats do not get results back before 24-48 hours... that is enough time to kill your pup. A SNAP TEST takes 10 minutes. What is the difference? A float costs $100, a snap test costs $6. What is the REAL difference? With a snap test you can start treating your pup in 15 minutes. With a float, your pup is all but dead by the time the results come back...GUARANTEED!

 So, if you are getting a puppy or kitten soon, call your vet and ask if they have VALID UNEXPIRED parvo snap tests in stock, right now.  If they dont... find another DVM that does.

You can buy your own at a slightly higher price than a DVM can but I think $140 per year investment is cheap in
comparison to improper expensive treatment from a vet who refuses to move into the new ages.

 I actually doubt very highly I make more than any DVM but I prefer to error on the side of a few dollars spent than feeling stupid when something strikes that I then wish I had on hand.  You do the math. But you PAY well for these guys who "supposedly care about your pet. Yet I tell you this for free. Irony?

TREATMENT OF PARVO:

TAMIFLU........ More precisely. UNMIXED Tamiflu 12mg/ml (25ml AFTER constitution)

One bottle can save an entire young litter.  Your regular doctor can prescribe this for you if your DVM won't. Unconstituted, this has a shelf life of 5 years.  

Tamiflu WORKS to treat Parvo. It does NOT cure it. But it is effective none-the-less. It will cost you $50 to treat your pup and save it's life.

 Starting to understand why DVM's don't want this info given to you? $50 to the pharmacy to save your dog... or $2,000-$6,000 per pup to the DVM to have them die anyway.

Don't think DVM's think like this? Call and ask what their recommended treatment for Parvo is.  The final test, tell them you are thinking of getting a pup. Ask if they have valid snap tests...and ask if they will call in a script of Tamiflu for you as a precaution. Dollars to donuts they won't.

 In the past years different news channels have done stories on how Parvo is becoming epidemic. Many of them were sent the following information (below). NOT ONE has followed up to tell the truth to people and save pups. WMUR and WCVB are the latest. WMUR in NH had this info in Jan or Feb of 2007. They have yet to follow up and get this info to the public of NH. Why? This is disgraceful. They ought to be ashamed.

 All of the info contained herein has been available to the public since at least 2004. It has been available to vets longer than that. 

Obviously because there is really no way for the DVM's of this country to make money off of this. it has not be very widely accepted and kept from the public 

This treatment usually costs vets more money because it DEMANDS THEY TAKE RESPONSIBILITY for the animals they treat.

When you compare $50 (paid to the pharmacy) against THOUSANDS PER PUPPY OR KITTEN paid to the DVM to treat Parvo. It is not hard to understand why lesser greedy people do not want this information widely spread to the general public.

 Vet's who did not keep Snap Tests on hand for testing for the Parvo-virus, which would buy a puppy 48 hours of EXTREMELY PRECIOUS TIME. ONLY because it would have require he keep these tests on hand and pay a whopping $60 per year for them is not a Vet that I, personally would waste my time going to.

EVERY pup - Every Vet practice reputation should be well worth $60 per year, and any vet who does not think the same way isn't one that would be held in high regard and one I would trust my precious puppy's life to. 

These irresponsible vets are 99% of all DVM's in the country. These are not the exception, they are unfortunately the rule. It is hard to walk away from thousands of dollars. It takes someone who really cares about animals. and there is the dilemma and irony.

 People DO NOT have spend thousands of dollars to save these pups & Kittens…just to watch them Die anyway.

 The real story is that DVM’s do not keep simple “Snap Tests” in stock that only cost them $30-$40 every 6 months, because they expire. They send out fecal tests that take over 24-48 hours to result.

With Parvo TIME IS ESSENTIAL. To save themselves $30 they kill young animals; as a “Snap Test” takes 10 minutes. As Parvo is time sensitive, this is the best way to test, as you can start treatment within 15mins.

 Tamiflu suspension does not CURE Parvo.

 What it does is simply renders the bacteria (which is what does the actual damage) that travels with this virus, useless. This then stops it from leaving the digestive track and harming internal organs. (how it kills pups and kittens). Effectively TREATING the animal and SAVING the animal for $50!!!!!

 The best way to PREVENT is to vaccinate with NEOPAR!  

This comparison came from http://www.neotechvaccines.com/

CPV Vaccine Titer per Dose Comparison

NEOPAR®
(NEOTECH, LLC) Average serial
3,162,278/dose

Vanguard
(Pfizer) serial 183615090,
100,000/dose

Progard
(Intervet) serial 4019001,
245,471/dose

Duramune KF-11
(Ft.Dodge) serial 1481474A,
794,328/dose

Duramune Max PV (2b)
(Ft.Dodge) serial 1211008,
15,849/dose

Reference:

Neopar http://www.revivalanimal.com/search.asp?t=ss&ss=neopar&image1.x=0&image1.y=0

 Neotech/Par website http://www.neotechvaccines.com/testimonials.htm

 Taniflu Alpha Study for Parvo & Kennel Cough http://www.ttva.org/conf_pro/abs/FernOTE.htm

 


A New Treatment For Parvoenteritis
by Dr. Jack Broadhurst

April 24, 2004, the concept of treating Parvoenteritis in dogs with a neuraminidase inhibitor such as Tamiflu on the Veterinary Information Network’s Infectious Disease Board. Since it’s introduction, Tamiflu has been used successfully by veterinarians, shelter workers and rescue groups to treat Parvoenteritis in thousands of dogs, cats and raccoons throughout the world. In order to understand the how and why this treatment has been so universally successful, there are several terms and concepts that have to be discussed:

Tamiflu: is a commercially available source of a neuraminidase inhibitor that has been used successfully in these cases.

 Neuraminidase: An enzyme that is produced by both bacteria and viruses. It is considered a virulence factor in viral and bacterial infections that require neuraminidase to remove biological barriers that protect the host from these pathogens.

Super infections: Any infection that requires both a virus and bacteria to produce an infection that is more pathogenic than either can produce alone. Veterinary examples: canine and feline parvo, canine kennel cough and influenza, feline URI, parvoenteritis in raccoons, and bloody scowls in deer.

 The use of Tamiflu in canine, feline, and raccoon parvoenteritis: The success of using a neuraminidase inhibitor in treating canine and feline parvo is due to the suppression the production of bacterial neuraminidase, and has no effect on the Parvovirus' ability to replicate. Puppies can still develop myocarditis and CHF...kittens can still develop cerebellar hypoplasia...the patient’s feces will still contain the viral antigen even while the animal is recovering.

Tamiflu does not interfere with the replication of the Parvovirus,as a result, no mutant or resistant strains of the Parvovirus will be created from the use of Tamiflu in the treatment of Parvoenteritis. 

Tamiflu should never be used to treat any animal that does not test (+) using the fecal antigen test prior to starting Tamiflu. All of the guidelines for using Tamiflu have been developed in cases that have had a (+) fecal Parvo test.

 Dose: 1mg/lb that dose given every 12 hours for 10 consecutive treatments...requires a (+) fecal antigen test.... should be given w/in 48 hrs of onset of clinical signs...if no response after the first dose...double to 2mg/lb for the second, third dose... 

Specific Breeds of Dogs: Dobes, Rotties, Retrievers, Pit Bulldogs, and Alaskan slead dogs...all require at least 2mg/lb as the starting dose as these breeds respond poorly to Parvo infections...

 As a preventive: One can give animals have been exposed, but are not currently showing any clinical signs one dose of 1mg/lb once a day for 5 days...if these animals develop one or more clinical signs (vomiting/bloody diarrhea/anorexia)...they should be given 1mg/lb every 12 hr for a total of 10 treatments.

 Animals requiring IV support: Animals sick enough to require IV support (fluids/antibiotics/antiemetics) respond poorly to Tamiflu as their clinical condition suggest that their GI tract has already been damaged beyond the ability of Tamiflu's ability to protect the patient. These animals should be started at 2mg/lb and the dose adjusted according to response every 12 hours.

 Animals that vomit after being given oral Tamiflu: These patients can be given the same dose as an enema. You can also divide the contents of a 75mg capsule into lines and mix the appropriate amount into pancake syrup or honey and place under the tongue or in the lip fold.

 Tamiflu Products: Suspension that you add 23 cc of water to get 25cc of 12mg/cc and 75mg capsules.... a flat of 10 capsules.... a 6 lb pup would get 0.5cc of the 12mg/cc suspension q. 12 hr x 10 Tx.

 To treat a 5 lb puppy: Mix the contents of 1 capsule into 10 cc of Canine Rebound...get 10 cc @ 7.5mg/cc....Refrigerate and shake well and give 1cc q. 12 hrs x 10 treatments.... do not mix capsules with water as this water suspension is .very bitter and will cause the patient to vomit.. One can also use liquid VAL or a similar vitamin prep.

 Tamiflu and FDA: On March 20, 2006, the FDA banned the use of Tamiflu and other neuraminidase inhibitors in treating chickens, ducks, turkeys and other birds...goes into effect in June 2006.... you can still use Tamiflu in dogs, cats, and raccoons.

 In the emergency clinics or private clinics that are presented with cases whose disease course is unknown or have exceeded the 48 hrs time-frame: The professional staff should make the client aware of the poor response to Tamiflu due to the high levels of bacterial neuraminidase currently present in the patient's GI tract, and the presence of GI pathology created prior to presentation. Tamiflu will only prevent future pathology, and can not reverse any pathology created prior to treatment.

 Treating Parvo requires the same mental process used in treating Diabetes Mellitus....The DVM begins with a standard initial dose of Tamiflu or insulin and then uses professional judgment to adjust the following doses required to get a clinical response.

 In an uncomplicated case, presented within 48 hrs. of the onset of clinical signs, one should see no vomiting after the first dose...no diarrhea after the 2nd...and alert/eating after the 3rd dose. If there is no clinical response after the 3rd dose...you have either started using Tamiflu too late, have a secondary medical problem that needs to be addressed, or have the wrong diagnosis.

 In summary, the introduction of the concept of using a neuraminidase inhibitor to treat canine, feline and raccoon Parvoenteritis, has open many new doors into the understanding of the pathobiology and treatment of this disease. Prior to April 24, 2004, Parvovirus was thought of a viral enteritis. Based on this concept, vaccines were developed to help prevent or reduce the severity of the clinical disease.

 Once the disease was diagnosed, treatment protocols were all designed to address the various end-products produced during the disease. The presence of vomiting usually dictated that most drugs were given intravenously. Animals that were hospitalized usually remained 3-7 days with unpredictable prognosis.

 This is because none of the treatments were addressing the core problem of excessive GI bacterial neuraminidase. They were being given to address all of the various end-reactions such as: vomiting, endotoxic shock, pain, bacterial septicemia, GI mucosal ulcerations and general organ failure. This approach required many drugs and many man hours to treat the multiple pathological processes associated with viral Parvoenteritis. 

With the introduction of using a neuraminidase inhibitor (Tamiflu), we established that Parvoenteritis is not a viral enteritis, but a super infection that requires the presence of bacterial neuraminidase. When a neuraminidase inhibitor is use under the strict guidelines developed since April 24, 2004, the disease is not allowed to develop into the clinical disease currently known as viral Parvoenteritis. The commensal bacteria do not transform into pathologic bacteria, and the patient’s disease is not allowed to progress as described in the veterinary literature. In order to achieve this reversal, there has to be a definitive diagnosis and the neuraminidase has to be given according to established guidelines.

 Dosage Info:

 What is the difference between ml or cc and mg?.....ml or cc are terms to describe the amount of volume given or w/in a container...ie...1 ounce is 30cc or 30ml....

 Mg is a term to describe the concentration w/in the amount of suspension/fluid...ie.. you can have a solution with 5mg/cc and another with 50mg/cc....the last is 10 times as concentrated or stronger than the first....when giving a liquid (suspension/solution) you have to know BOTH numbers. 

If 23cc of water are added to a bottle containing the mfgs' amount of powder....you will end up with 25cc (volume) and each cc will contain 12mg (concentration)/cc.....to give a 6 lb puppy 1mg/lb...you would give 0.5cc or 6mg of the suspension.....a 12 lb puppy would receive 1cc of a 12mg/cc suspension....

 Your puppies weigh between 7-9 lbs according to your 12/22/06 E-mail....they should be receiving at least 0.8cc of a 12mg/cc suspension...it would not hurt to give them 1cc or 12mg...this is still less than 2mg/lb....

 If the pharmacy made up a 25mg/cc suspension...then each 0.1cc would contain 2.5mg and 4 x 2.5 = 10mg...she would be giving 10 mg every time she gave 0.4 of a 25mg/cc suspension.

 





Veterinarians over-diagnose Parvo. 
Really, most of these dogs just have a bacterial infection with Campylobacter. 
It can be treated with oral medicine that you can buy from a fish store. 
 
What is the difference between Crud and Parvo?
The simple difference is that Crud dogs do not have fevers and are generally active and alert and have good appetites. They remain
 this way until they are massively dehydrated.
Dogs with Parvo develop fevers, are lethargic, and do not want to eat. There are other differences, but these are the obvious ones.


CAMPYLOBACTER - The MISTAKEN PARVO KILLER

Parvo Like Symptoms

When your dog shows first symptoms, immediately go to your veterinarian and have a Parvo Test run,
 so you know what you are dealing with!  Often times the Parvo Test will show a low scale
for Parvo in the beginning and have shown 'full blown' Parvo as it progress only to be
confirmed after death through an autopsy that it was "NOT" Parvo.

 

The name of this infection is "Campylobacteriosis."
 

Definition: Campylobacteriosis: acute diarrhea in puppies runs course in seven to ten days ***
can cause a severe enteritis in humans.

It's a bacterial imbalance in the digestive tract. Will sometimes test low positive for Parvovirus.

It is BACTERIAL. It is NOT a new form of Parvo.

"The Crud" is a Bacterial overgrowth in the digestive tract. It will sometimes test low positive for Parvovirus. It is NOT a new form of Parvo although symptoms are quite similar to parvo. Crud dogs do not have a high temperature, nor will they have intestinal lesions. If a normal fecal is run on feces which are not quite to the watery and bloody stage, it will show a very high bacterial content and will be negative for parvo (usually).

Any one of the normal bacteria found in the digestive tract will go into overgrowth. The mystery is what triggers it. Possibly infected urine/feces or something brought in on shoes or clothing or from a visiting dog. We know what cures it and what to do when a dog hasn't been treated quick enough. And of course we know the end results with a dog that dies of it.

 


Very Contagious
Mode of infection: widely varied, but mostly from contact with urine, feces, something brought in on shoes, etc.

Symptoms start 12- 48hrs after initial contact (usually) & spread to other dogs rapidly.

Symptoms+

Symptoms start 12-48 hrs after initial contact (usually) and may spread to other dogs rapidly.

Dogs are alert, hungry, energetic. Normal feces starts with mucus sheath & continues to get progressively softer until it is watery & contains blood. It then becomes explosive. Vomiting may accompany & may or may not also contain blood. Feces have a sweet/flowery aroma along with a "slaughterhouse on a summer day" smell (similar to Parvo diarrhea but
with a floral hint). Feces are *usually* mustard colored. Dogs dehydrate at an astounding rate. Dogs are also at risk of intussusceptions.

What is happening is that there is a bacterial growth in the digestive tract which throws it off balance. The body is trying to counteract this by removing the extra (or offending) bacteria. It seems to do this by trying to remove ALL body fluids as quickly as possible. Death is caused by massive dehydration. This can occur as quickly as 12hrs or continue
for a few days. The younger the dog, the worse it is. Some dogs may never get it, even though they may be kenneled with an afflicted dog. Some dogs also get over this without treatment.


Treatment
The key is to treat this as fast as possible before the dogs go anorexic AND to treat ALL dogs on the premises (non-afflicted dogs should get ONE capsule). Treatment is 250 mg Erythromycin up to 4 times a day depending on severity.

This MUST be given orally NOT I/V - it MUST go thru the digestive tract (I don't know WHY it works this way, but it does). If the dog vomits the pill up, just give it again until it stays down. Give another dose approx. 12hrs later. If the dog returns to normal DO NOT medicate again. It's important NOT to run a full 10 day course of this drug as it has (in the past) caused the bacterial balance to go the other way. If needed, give medication for 2 more days, or whenever symptoms reoccur.

If the dogs are massively dehydrated, DO NOT use an IV drip. Their circulatory system will be very depressed & *if* a vein can be found, it may not be able to support an IV. Lactated Ringers Solution SUB-Q is suggested & forcing electrolytes orally. IV rehydration HAS thrown animals into deep shock (see above). Slow rehydration. Slow slow slow.
Just enough to keep them alive until the *bug* is nipped in the bud.

After the diarrhea has stopped, you can cram the dog as full of fluids as you want, just not when it is at its most fragile point.

Anorexic dogs have to be tempted to eat again. Rare, bloody, slightly garlicky & slightly salty beef has worked the best in the past forgetting the appetites working. Start small. You may have to give anorexic dogs Nutri-Cal to get them going again. But after they are cured they *will* begin to eat again.


Do NOT automatically assume Parvo when you see this.

Parvo treatments have killed the majority of Crud dogs.

If you suspect Parvo, try the Erythromycin 1st, if it doesn't work, THEN assume Parvo.

Do NOT use Amoxicillin.

Keflex has worked in the past. Dogs should show improvement within hours of treatment.




 

More on Campylobacter

The Campylobacter Jejuni is a Gram-Negative, slender curved, and motile rod.  It is a species of bacteria that resembles small tightly coiled spirals.  Its organisms are known to cause abortion in sheep and fever and stomach inflammation in man and may be associated with enteric diseases of calves, lambs and other animals.  A genus of bacteria found in the reproductive organs, intestinal tract and oral cavity of animals and man.  Some species are pathogenic.  It is a microaerophilic organism, which means it has a requirement of reduced levels of oxygen.  It is relatively fragile and sensitive to environmental stresses (e.g. 21% oxygen, drying, heating, disinfectants and acidic conditions).  It causes more disease than Shigella spp and Salmonella spp combined. (Taken from the US FDA "Bad Bug Book") It is also known as Campylobacter enteritis or gastroenteritis. 

It can also be mis-diagnosed as Sirochete, Parvo or Giardia diarrhea.  Mis-diagnosing and wrong
treatment will mostly likely result in death.

 

 TESTING:  
Diagnosis is direct fecal on a VERY fresh (still warm, so bacteria are still alive) sample, mixed with saline and examined microscopically. 
There is usually a decrease in normal bacterial numbers and motility.  Blood testing will result in the low positive for Parvo. 
Tests are not conclusive, so if a low Parvo test is shown start treatment immediately!

 INCUBATION TIME:

Its incubation period is reported to be anywhere from 2 to 10 days.

 SYMPTOMS:

    These can mimic parvo.  The diarrhea does not always have the foul odor. It usually progresses as follows.  Begins with mucus-covered solid stools, loose stools, progresses to diarrhea, profuse diarrhea, the squirts, depressed appetite with or without vomiting.  The diarrhea may be watery or sticky and can contain (but not always) blood.  These symptoms can be minor to severe.  Some animals hardly show any symptoms, while others can become fatally dehydrated.  Also seen are temperature drops and shock followed by death and all within 12-24 hours.  In very young puppies you will hear them cry quite loudly and nothing will comfort them, then respiratory problems occur.  Puppies need attention immediately as the fatality rate is high

SOURCE OF INFECTION:

Fecal matter, non-chlorinated water, such as streams, ponds or puddles ' food poisoning from food or from a human who has food poison, even a light case.  This disease can also be transmitted to these areas by our common fly, flitting from one host to another.  The bacteria is also found in raw or under cooked meat  (barfers be aware please) .  For all intents and purposes for the Dog Show Crud, it is transmitted in public X-Pens and public elimination areas.  Some also say through urine, saliva via contact, or through the air.  This bacteria reproduces at a rapid rate.

TREATMENT. 

As soon as any of the symptoms are seen, see your vet immediately for the proper tests, because the disease progresses so rapidly.  Re-hydration may be required within a few hours of the onset.  This is the worst scenario. It could be that the dog will have a very mild case and be treated at home with anti-diarrhea medication and antibiotics but it is not worth it to take the chance.  Most cases are not as drastic/catastrophic, clinically as Parvo if treatment is done in a timely manner.  The younger the dog the more serious the case. 

Drug for treatment is  Erythromycin (*some have had success using  Chloramphenicol, Cephalexin, Keflex and Tetracycline) 

Drug preparations containing gentamycin or the fluoroquinolones such as ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin are recommended for treatment of campylobacteriosis in Nigeria.

Many veterinarians have recommended that if you have a dog with diarrhea, cramping, vomiting, etc., and has been  to a dog show, camping, groomer, park, or any public place, or if any one in your family has been ill with diarrhea or  food poison like symptoms, etc., that the dog be seen by your vet as soon as possible to diagnose the problem and  treat it accordingly.




RESEARCH

Research showed Erythromycin was the most effective against Campylobacter, with total strain sensitivity from both
groups at very low concentrations (lower or equal to 0.06 mg/mL). This is corroborated by several authors
(FOX et al., 1984; REINA et al., 1984; SKIRROW, 1994; GANDREAU & GILBERT, 1998). Erythromycin is effective in
treating dogs, but was not able to eliminate the passive carrier status of some treated dogs (MONFORT et al., 1990;
BOOSINGER & DILLON, 1992; BURNENS et al., 1992).

Results indicate erythromycin, enrofloxacin, and gentamicin as drugs suitable for the treatment of canine campylobacteriosis.

DRAWBACK TO DRUGS:

gentamicin sulfate (ped) (PF) Inj Warnings

This medication can cause serious kidney problems and nerve damage, resulting in permanent hearing loss (including deafness or decreased hearing) and balance problems. The risk is increased if you are older, already have kidney disease, or if you have a severe loss of body water (dehydration). Your risk is also increased if you receive high doses, or with longer use of this medication.

 




Helpful Suggestions for Recovery of Puppies with Campylobacter


The name of this infection is "Campylobacteriosis."

Definition:

Campylobacteriosis: acute diarrhea in puppies runs course in seven to ten days ***can cause a severe enteritis in human-s.  It's a bacterial imbalance in the digestive tract. Will sometimes test low positive for
Parvovirus. It is BACTERIAL. It is NOT a new form of Parvo.

Mode of infection:

widely varied, but mostly from contact with urine, feces, something brought in on shoes, etc.

Symptoms start 12- 48hrs after initial contact (usually) & spread to other dogs rapidly.

Dogs are alert, hungry, energetic and then bam - they are lethargic, depressed and dehydrating.

Normal feces starts with mucus sheath & continues to get progressively softer until it is watery & contains blood.

It then becomes explosive. Vomiting may accompany & may or may not also contain blood. Feces
have a sweet/flowery aroma along with a "slaughterhouse on a summer day"
smell (similar to Parvo diarrhea but with a floral hint). Feces are *usually* mustard colored.

Dogs dehydrate at an astounding rate. Dogs are also at risk of intussusceptions.

What is happening is that there is a bacterial growth in the digestive tract which throws it off balance. The body is trying to counteract this by removing the extra (or offending) bacteria. It seems to do this by trying to
remove ALL body fluids as quickly as possible. Death is caused by massive dehydration. This can occur as quickly as 12hrs or continue for a few days.
The younger the dog, the worse it is. Some dogs may never get it, even though they may be kenneled with an afflicted dog. Some dogs also get over this without treatment. The key is to treat this as fast as possible before
the dogs go anorexic AND to treat ALL dogs on the premises (non-afflicted dogs should get ONE capsule).

Treatment is 250 mg Erythromycin up to 4 times a day depending on severity.

Anorexic dogs have to be tempted to eat again. Rare, bloody, slightly garlicky & slightly salty beef has worked the best in the past forgetting the appetites working. Start small. You may have to give anorexic dogs Nutri-Cal to get them going again. But after they are cured they *will* begin to eat again. Do NOT automatically assume Parvo when you see this.
Parvo treatments have killed the majority of Crud dogs. If you suspect Parvo, try the Erythromycin 1st, if it doesn't work, THEN assume Parvo.
Do NOT use Amoxicillin.
Keflex has worked in the past.
Dogs should show improvement within hours of treatment.

Added Live Culture (yogurt and glucose) immediately following the cephalexin has seen even faster improvement.

It is important that the Erythromycin hits the stomach and stays down!  Dissolving a capsule and mixing w/ pedialyte, administering w/ a syringe to assure the meds enter the stomach before
vomiting starts again is critical if the dog does not keep the capsule down long enough for the coating to dissolve.

DO NOT USE ANY ANTI-DIARRHEAL DRUGS!
The bacteria needs to come out, hydration via sq fluids is key. One the Erythromycin is administered, it is more of
a "maintenance" of hydration and glucose until they are back on their feet again.

The first symptoms are vomit that is clear and also yellow, diarrhea that turns from a soft yellow to a pale pink, then bloody. Without treatment, pups die and stronger pups or dogs will follow the "stomach illness" side of
this w/ a cough that resembles kennel cough, yet is resistant to traditional treatments.
Thick mucous in the eyes and sometimes nose and a generalized achiness and stiffness in the joints. Also, The signs we are seeing is a skin breakout resembling mange around the eyes, ears and underarms which is resistant to traditional mange treatments and no mites are found on skin scrapes.
A false positive for parvo on in house tests is possible!
 
Parvo treatment kills pups with CRUD!
Keeping them warm is critical , as they do not run a fever but have a sudden drop in body temp.

 

My vet is unwilling to treat my dog for Crud.

He has never heard of it before. What do I do or say to change his attitude?

Give him the Crud Treatment Article.

Have him research bacterial overgrowths.

Remind him that new ideas are what has helped to bring about cures for a myriad of diseases.

Urge him to have an open mind and be willing to accept new ideas.

If that doesn't work, find another vet.